Classes

EMR 121: Native Americans in the 21st Century: Nation Building II

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020
This field-based research course focuses on some of the major issues Native American Indian tribes and nations face as the 21st century begins. It provides in-depth, hands-on exposure to native development issues, including: sovereignty, economic development, constitutional reform, leadership, health and social welfare, land and water rights, culture and language, religious freedom, and education. In particular, the course emphasizes problem definition, client relationships, and designing and completing a research project. The course is devoted primarily to preparation and presentation of a... Read more about EMR 121: Native Americans in the 21st Century: Nation Building II

SOCIOL 1103: Environment and Inequality

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

Instructor: Vivian Shaw
Meeting time: Wednesday, 12:00 - 2:00

How does your zip code affect your health? What are the social and political consequences to building a dam? How do natural disasters exacerbate racial inequalities? This seminar explores environmental issues through the lens of inequality, focusing particularly on race, indigeneity, gender, and (dis)ability...

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HIST 1015: Native American Women: History and Myth

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020
Instructor: Tiya Miles
Meeting time: Tuesday and Thursday, 1:30 - 2:45 
 
This course explores histories of women from diverse indigenous nations within the current boundaries of the United States. We will attend closely to methods and sources employed in historical inquiry about Native women even as we track change over time...
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HIST-LIT 90EB: Gender and Empire in the Modern Mediterranean

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

Instructor: John Boonstra
Meeting time: Wednesday, 12:45 - 2:45

Gender and EmpireQuestions of empire are fundamentally intertwined with questions of gender. This course will focus on the imperial and intercultural contact zones of the Mediterranean—at once connecting and dividing Europe, the Middle East, and North Africa—from the eighteenth to the twenty-first century. With an interest both in men’s and women’s experiences and in representations... Read more about HIST-LIT 90EB: Gender and Empire in the Modern Mediterranean

HIST-LIT 90EA: Water Justice and Resistance in the Americas

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

Instructor: James Mestaz
Meeting time: Tuesday, 3:00 - 5:00

Water JusticeWater is life, but is it a human right? Water governance is a contentious issue globally because humans rely on water for nearly every productive activity; moreover, it is often scarce and not distributed equally. To better understand the persistence and escalation of struggles over water access around the world, this course uses a multidisciplinary approach ... Read more about HIST-LIT 90EA: Water Justice and Resistance in the Americas

HIST-LIT 90DZ: Too Soon? Comedy in Europe’s Tragic Twentieth Century

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

Instructor: Kathryn Brackney
Meeting time: Monday, 3:00-5:00

Too Soon?

In the first half the twentieth century, Europe was the site of two wars that depleted the world’s population, dislocated millions, and stripped once diverse regions of the continent of their minority populations. Even as Europe started to rebuild itself in the 1950s, progress occurred under the shadow of two hegemonic superpowers in possession of weapons capable of incinerating not just both sides of the Iron Curtain but the entire planet.... Read more about HIST-LIT 90DZ: Too Soon? Comedy in Europe’s Tragic Twentieth Century

HIST-LIT 90AT: The Postwar American Road Narrative

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

Instructor: Patrick Whitmarsh
Meeting time: Thursday, 3:00-5:00

Postwar American RoadThis seminar explores the idea of the road in postwar American literature and cultural history, paying particular attention to how this idea changes along with shifting dynamics of race, gender, and class.  In addition to its relationship to cultural and national identity, students will examine how the road redefines notions of space, place, and belonging in the second half of the twentieth century. ... Read more about HIST-LIT 90AT: The Postwar American Road Narrative

AFVS 197K: Cinemas of Resistance: Political Filmmaking Across the Globe

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2019

Instructor: Kate Rennebohm
Meeting time: Wednesday, 3:00-5:45

Cinemas of ResistanceCan film change the world? What can the history of engaged film and media-making teach us about politics, and vice-versa? This course will study instances of political filmmaking from around the world: early 20th century avant-garde filmmaking, anti-colonialist and anti-imperialist cinemas, feminist and queer filmmaking, Indigenous cinemas, and more. ... Read more about AFVS 197K: Cinemas of Resistance: Political Filmmaking Across the Globe

FRSEMR 631: The First Americans: Portraits of Indigenous Power and Diplomacy

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2019

Instructor: Shawon Kinew
Meeting time: Friday, 12:00-2:45

The First AmericansHarvard’s Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology is home to 25 oil portraits of indigenous American leaders painted in the first half of the 19th century. Originally commissioned to preserve cultures an American bureaucrat feared would be extinct, these paintings transcend a moribund history. In fact, the Native American nations represented are still here.... Read more about FRSEMR 631: The First Americans: Portraits of Indigenous Power and Diplomacy

EMR 123: Issues in the Studies of Native American Religion

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2019

Instructor: Ann Braude
Meeting time: Tuesday and Thursday, 10:30 - 11:45

Based around a series of guest speakers, the course interrogates the study of religion in general and of Native American traditions in particular in light of indigenous perspectives and histories. Questions of appropriation, repatriation and religious freedom will be approached through legal as well as cultural...

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ANTHRO 1900: Counseling as Colonization? Native American Encounters with the Clinical Psy-ences

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2019

Instructor: Joseph Gone
Meeting time: Monday, 12:00 - 2:45

American Indian, First Nations, and other Indigenous communities of the USA and Canada contend with disproportionately high rates of “psychiatric” distress. Many of these communities attribute this distress to their long colonial encounters with European settlers. Concurrently, throughout the 20th century, the disciplines and professions associated with mind, brain, and behavior (e.g., psychiatry, psychology, psychoanalysis) consolidated their authority and influence within mainstream society.... Read more about ANTHRO 1900: Counseling as Colonization? Native American Encounters with the Clinical Psy-ences

HIST 14M: "Black Indians": The Making of an Identity

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2019
Instructor: Tiya Miles
Meeting time: Wednesday, 12:00 - 2:00 
 
Black IndiansThis seminar will explore intersections in African American and Native American histories with an emphasis on pivotal moments in the shaping of a modern identity referred to as “Black Indian.”  Students in this seminar will explore and analyze historical contexts and contingencies leading to thick interactions between people of African descent and indigenous Americans as well as experiential testimony by individuals asserting mixed race and/or bi-cultural Afro-Native identities. ... Read more about HIST 14M: "Black Indians": The Making of an Identity

ANTHRO 1190: The Invasion of America: The Anthropology of American Encounters, 1492-1830

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2019

Instructor: Matt Liebmann
Meeting time: Tuesday and Thursday, 12:00 - 1:15

The Invasion of AmericaIn 1492 Native Americans discovered Europeans, changing the world forever.  The European invasion of the Americas triggered demographic, economic, and ecological changes on an unprecedented scale.  The subsequent movement of plants, animals, and goods prompted global shifts in population, exploitation of resources, and the transformation of environments... Read more about ANTHRO 1190: The Invasion of America: The Anthropology of American Encounters, 1492-1830

HIST-LIT 90DV: Red Scares

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2019

Instructor: Steve Biel and Lauren Kaminsky
Meeting time: Thursday, 3:00 - 5:00

Red ScaresWhen, in his 2019 State of the Union address, President Trump said, “We are born free, and we will stay free. Tonight, we renew our resolve that America will never be a socialist country,” he invoked American rhetoric that reaches back to the European revolutions of 1848. The first so-called Red Scare, precipitated by World War I and the Bolshevik Revolution in Russia, ... Read more about HIST-LIT 90DV: Red Scares

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